Will Europe Get Its Own Bomb?

TetraisThe idea of a European nuclear deterrent has been a regular feature of the security debate on the continent for more than 50 years, to the point of sometimes being called an “elephant in the room.” In the early 1960s, as Europeans demanded a greater say in North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) strategy, there were plans for a nuclear multilateral force under European control.

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Reporting Security Concerns in the Nuclear/Radiological Industry: New Evidence to the Study of Whistle-blowing

B 057 THUMBThis article aims to study challenges and drivers for reporting in the nuclear and radiological sector. First, it discusses the meaning of whistle-blowing and reporting.Secondly, it demonstrates how reporting is encouraged by the international community through IAEA guidance and Nuclear Industry Summit statements. Then by using survey data received from 56 participants, the study examines factors influencing reporting.

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Is the Iran Nuclear Deal on Its Last Legs?

Atlantic councilIran’s plans to violate a central tenet of the 2015 nuclear deal by exceeding limits placed on enriched uranium “will be the final blow to an agreement that the United States mortally wounded a year ago,” according to Barbara Slavin, director of the Atlantic Council’s Future of Iran Initiative.

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source: www.atlanticcouncil.org

The Crisis of Nuclear Disarmament and Arms Control: Diagnosis and Future Concepts

next genWhatever our expectations in disarmament and non-proliferation were a few years ago, they have now changed – and certainly for the worse. The global nuclearnon-proliferation regime, the strategic stability between the major powers and other states, are at risk. In addition, the serious challenges to progress toward nuclear disarmament and arms control have increased in recent years.

source: Proceedings of the N.EX.T. Generation,Volume 45 of the Publication Series on Democracy

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Negotiating Verification: International Diplomacy and the Evolution of Nuclear Safeguards, 1945–1972

fdps20.v030.i01.coverNuclear safeguards have been an essential part of the global order since the beginnings of the nuclear age. The International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA], an international bureaucracy that is supposed to be a non-political, technical institution administers this global nuclear safeguards regime. Even though safeguards have always been controversial, they have turned out to be the most enduring item in the international community’s toolbox to prevent or slow down the spread of nuclear weapons to non-nuclear states.

source: Taylor & Francis Online

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Future Directions in IAEA Safeguards

future directionsThe concept of nuclear safeguards was outlined by the United States, United Kingdom and Canada in the 1945 Agreed Declaration on Atomic Energy. This called for the establishment of an Atomic Energy Commission to make proposals, inter alia, for:… effective safeguards by way of inspection and other means to protect complying states against the hazards of violations and evasions.[1]

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