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Can Europe save the JCPOA?

can eu save JCPOAOn May 8, President Trump “withdrew” the United States from a deal agreed by his predecessor to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons. US withdrawal was not foreseen when the agreement was drafted, nor was the possibility that the United States might stand in isolation from its closest international partners. Withdrawal also did not mean that the deal ended.

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Nuclear Safeguards and the Security of Nuclear Materials

Nuclear Safeguards thumbNuclear technology is Janus-headed; it is a dual-use technology with both peaceful and military applications. Concerns about the misuse of peaceful applications of nuclear energy were at first focused on states seeking nuclear weapons. The first concepts for restricting nuclear energy to peaceful purposes were proposed in the context of a broad international agreement under the auspices of the newly formed United Nations.

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Second Time is NOT a Charm for the Nuclear Ban Treaty

Second Time is NOT a Charm thmbSo the well-intended states and civil society groups in New York have produced a second draft of the nuclear weapons ban convention. The draft shows real work, and drafters deserve credit for some notable improvements. However, aside from questionable nature of the exercise to begin with, the second draft retains many of the specific problems associated with the first and raises new, serious questions.

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India’s Nuclear Safeguards: Not Fit for Purpose

India NSCurrently, the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) is considering India’s application for membership. In this context NSG members are reportedly discussing membership criteria for states not party to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), including a requirement for clear and strict separation of current and future civilian nuclear facilities from non-civilian nuclear facilities. In this paper, John Carlson examines India’s Separation Plan and safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and shows that they do not meet this standard – that current arrangements create an unverified grey zone between military and civilian material, and are not sufficient to verify that India is not using safeguarded material to benefit military purposes.

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